Google Chromekey may be a $35 HDMI stick PC | Android | Geek.com

Google may be working on an inexpensive HDMI stick PC of its very own called the Chromekey. It’s going to be quite a bit different than Dell’s Project Ophelia or the innumerable Android sticks you may have read about.

There’s some debate about what kind of software the Chromekey will ship with. If the name is accurate, you’d expect Google to go withChrome OS. Then again, Google has an OS that’s built specifically the kinds of displays that feature HDMI ports — Google TV. Android’s a pretty good fit on those screens, too.

But Chrome OS might make the most sense if Google’s intent here is to capture a chunk of the desktop computing market. An inexpensive Chrome OS stick that offers decent performance could be an excellent fit for schools and shared computers (like those in hotels and libraries). It’d even fit the bill for homes where web surfing is pretty much the only computing that’s going on.

Droid Life has received other information, however. Their source says that the Chromekey will act as a sort of wireless receiver and will work in conjunction with Google’s apps on existing (and future) devices. You may, for example, be able to queue up a YouTube playlist on your phone and beam it to the Chromekey for big screen viewing.

Read more @ Geek.com.

AnandTech | Intel Iris Pro 5200 Graphics Review: Core i7-4950HQ Tested

The Prelude

As Intel got into the chipset business it quickly found itself faced with an interesting problem. As the number of supported IO interfaces increased (back then we were talking about things like AGP, FSB), the size of the North Bridge die had to increase in order to accommodate all of the external facing IO. Eventually Intel ended up in a situation where IO dictated a minimum die area for the chipset, but the actual controllers driving that IO didn’t need all of that die area. Intel effectively had some free space on its North Bridge die to do whatever it wanted with. In the late 90s Micron saw this problem and contemplating throwing some L3 cache onto its North Bridges. Intel’s solution was to give graphics away for free.

The budget for Intel graphics was always whatever free space remained once all other necessary controllers in the North Bridge were accounted for. As a result, Intel’s integrated graphics was never particularly good. Intel didn’t care about graphics, it just had some free space on a necessary piece of silicon and decided to do something with it. High performance GPUs need lots of transistors, something Intel would never give its graphics architects – they only got the bare minimum. It also didn’t make sense to focus on things like driver optimizations and image quality. Investing in people and infrastructure to support something you’re giving away for free never made a lot of sense.

Intel hired some very passionate graphics engineers, who always petitioned Intel management to give them more die area to work with, but the answer always came back no. Intel was a pure blooded CPU company, and the GPU industry wasn’t interesting enough at the time. Intel’s GPU leadership needed another approach.

A few years ago they got that break. Once again, it had to do with IO demands on chipset die area. Intel’s chipsets were always built on a n-1 or n-2 process. If Intel was building a 45nm CPU, the chipset would be built on 65nm or 90nm. This waterfall effect allowed Intel to help get more mileage out of its older fabs, which made the accountants at Intel quite happy as those $2 – $3B buildings are painfully useless once obsolete. As the PC industry grew, so did shipments of Intel chipsets. Each Intel CPU sold needed at least one other Intel chip built on a previous generation node. Interface widths as well as the number of IOs required on chipsets continued to increase, driving chipset die areas up once again. This time however, the problem wasn’t as easy to deal with as giving the graphics guys more die area to work with. Looking at demand for Intel chipsets, and the increasing die area, it became clear that one of two things had to happen: Intel would either have to build more fabs on older process nodes to keep up with demand, or Intel would have to integrate parts of the chipset into the CPU.

Not wanting to invest in older fab technology, Intel management green-lit the second option: to move the Graphics and Memory Controller Hub onto the CPU die. All that would remain off-die would be a lightweight IO controller for things like SATA and USB. PCIe, the memory controller, and graphics would all move onto the CPU package, and then eventually share the same die with the CPU cores.

Pure economics and an unwillingness to invest in older fabs made the GPU a first class citizen in Intel silicon terms, but Intel management still didn’t have the motivation to dedicate more die area to the GPU. That encouragement would come externally, from Apple.

Looking at the past few years of Apple products, you’ll recognize one common thread: Apple as a company values GPU performance. As a small customer of Intel’s, Apple’s GPU desires didn’t really matter, but as Apple grew, so did its influence within Intel. With every microprocessor generation, Intel talks to its major customers and uses their input to help shape the designs. There’s no sense in building silicon that no one wants to buy, so Intel engages its customers and rolls their feedback into silicon. Apple eventually got to the point where it was buying enough high-margin Intel silicon to influence Intel’s roadmap. That’s how we got Intel’s HD 3000. And that’s how we got here.

Read the full review @ AnandTech.

How to create a default WordPress thumbail for post thumbnails.

I have been trying to create a default thumbnail for my blog. I just can’t get over that empty space that remains if there is no thumbnail defined. I could have let the post take up the entire width in case there is no thumbnail but i kept running into an issue where, on mobile devices everything turned out quirky. Either the thumbnail would take up the entire post or push the actual content out of view so that one would to constantly have to scroll sideways in order to read the post. So i would rather settle to set up an image that would show up in case i don’t have or don’t specify a thumbnail.

Well, easier said then done. I found some good information around the web including wordpress’s own support forums; however, none of the suggested solutions quiet suited me needs perfectly. For one, i want this to work as automatically and integrated as possible as i am actually working on this as a solution for a wordpress theme. This basically rules out any plugin as I would like it to incorporate with the theme itself. Also, plugins often, by nature, offer many more features then what I would have use for. I want to keep this as simple and functional as possible.

So my first thought was to add a simple “IF” “ELSE” and add a direct link to the image. Easy right? Yes it is, it is also not working. This would not have been an ideal solution since one would have to add the link to every new page created. Also, it have to code the link appropriately because you can not just go ahead and do something like this:

<a href="<?php the_permalink(); ?>" rel="bookmark"><img src="images/default-thumb.png" alt="thumbnail" /></a>

This did not work, so did this:

<a href="<?php the_permalink(); ?>" rel="bookmark"><img src="http://www.yourdomain.com/images/default-thumb.png" alt="thumbnail" /></a>

The first example won’t work because wordpress won’t be able to find the directory specified, this is especially not usable for a theme because at this point we don’t really know where that directory is going to be. In the 2nd example we did specify the full path; however, this will work as a quick fix for someone with very few pages. Also not suitable for a theme  because every  person using the theme would have to change the path specific to their environment. That’s no good.

Unfortunately, all to often I saw people recommend this method  or similar methods to accomplish a quick and easy fix. I found a handful who took that approach and have at least done it right. If so, it should look something like this:

<a href="<?php the_permalink(); ?>" rel="bookmark"><div><?php echo '<img src="' . get_bloginfo('template_directory') . '/images/default-thumb.png' . '" alt="thumbnail" />'; ?></div></a>

What is different here? First of, we are calling the “template_directory”. This makes things much easier as we don’t have to specify the full path and can make sure that wordpress will look in and  find the right directory. So regardless where the wordpress installation is stored or deep it is buried in your file system it will always look in it’s own directory. Second, we can’t use the “template_directory” by itself. Not only is it not a free standing call function but we also still need the full path. The “get_bloginfo()” function can do that for us. The “get_bloginfo()” function basically holds all the basic information about your blog, everything is set up on under the “General Settings” in your wordpress admin panel. All the information, like the template directory, can be called up individually.

So now, with the right information in place, putting this snippit into your pages makes much more sense. I wanted to take this one step further. Instead of having to add this code snippit everywhere I would rather like to be able to call it up as a function or function parameter which leads us to the functions.php.

What I did was, set up a function in the functions.php dedicated to the default thumbnail handling. I ended up with this:

function default_thumbnail() {
echo '<img src="' . get_bloginfo('template_directory') . '/images/default-thumb.png' . '" alt="Default Thumbnail Placeholder" />';
}
add_action('default_thumbnail','textdomain_default_thumbnail');

See what I did here. Yeah, the link is pretty much the same. I just made it a function. This way I can just call on “default_thumbnail” and don’t have to remember the full link and so forth. We are not all done yet though. We still have to add the theme support like this:

add_theme_support( 'default_thumbnail' );

And all done. Now your new default thumbnail link will look like this:

<a href="<?php the_permalink(); ?>" rel="bookmark"><div><?php default_thumbnail(); ?></div></a>

And the full loop could look something like this:

<?php if ( has_post_thumbnail() && ! post_password_required() ) : ?>
<a href="<?php the_permalink(); ?>" rel="bookmark"><div class="entry-thumbnail"><?php the_post_thumbnail(); ?></div></a>
<?php else : ?>
<a href="<?php the_permalink(); ?>" rel="bookmark"><div class="entry-thumbnail"><?php default_thumbnail(); ?></div></a>
<?php endif; ?>

Intel Readies Bay Trail for  Holiday 2013 Tablets and 2-in-1 Devices

Highlights Next-Generation 22nm Intel® Atom™ Processor Products Aimed at Tablets and Smartphones, and Demonstrates Global 4G LTE Solution

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

  • Next-generation 22nm Intel® Atom™ processor-based SoC for tablets based on Silvermont microarchitecture to include quad core processing, Gen 7 graphics, support for DX11, full HD, Intel® Burst Technology 2.0, hardware-based security features, 2x CPU improvement and 3x graphics improvement1 and support for Windows* and Android*.
  • Highlights recent momentum around the Intel® Atom™ processor Z2580 with the Lenovo* K900 and ASUS* Fonepad Note FHD6 and ASUS* MeMO Pad FHD 10 announcements.
  • New Samsung GALAXY Tab 3 10.1-inch, equipped with Intel’s 3G and 4G LTE solutions, and powered by the Intel® Atom™ processor-based SoC (“Clover Trail+”) platform for Android* tablets.
  • Demonstrates Intel® XMM 7160 multimode 4G LTE solution, now in final interoperability testing (IOT) with Tier 1 service providers across North America, Europe and Asia.

COMPUTEX, Taipei, Taiwan, June 5, 2013 – At an industry event in Taipei today, Hermann Eul, general manager of Intel’s Mobile and Communications Group, unveiled new details about the company’s forthcoming Intel®  Atom™ processor-based  SoC for tablets (“Bay Trail-T”) due in market for holiday this year.

Based on the new Silvermont microarchitecture, the next generation 22nm Intel technology for tablets and ultra-mobile devices will enable sleek designs with 8 or more hours of battery life2 and weeks of standby, as well as support Android* and Windows 8.1*.

Eul also spoke to recent momentum and announcements around the smartphone business and demonstrated the Intel® XMM 7160 multimode 4G LTE solution, now in final interoperability testing (IOT) with Tier 1 service providers across North America, Europe and Asia.

“The mobile category is undergoing a tremendous amount of innovation and constant change,” said Eul. “As we look at growing it, we continue to invest in and accelerate our efforts across all aspects of mobility with a focus on smartphones, tablets and wireless communications. Intel’s unique assets will enable more compelling and differentiated products and experiences, while at the same time helping to shape and lead markets in the future.”

Next-Generation 22nm Intel® Atom™ Processor-based SoC for Tablets and 2-in-1s
Building on the progress of the Intel® Atom™ processor Z2760, the new products will deliver efficient, quad core processing that doubles the performance over the previous generation, according to Eul.

The next-generation Intel Atom processor-based SoC for tablets (“Bay Trail”) provides the best balance of performance, features and battery life, he added. Taking full advantage of the broad spectrum of capabilities enabled by Intel’s design, microarchitecture, 22nm tri-gate transistor technology, and leading-edge manufacturing, Intel can quickly scale up and down in performance and power efficiency to address various market and product needs. With the new 22nm Silvermont architecture, Intel delivers industry-leading performance with fewer cores, allowing Intel platforms to bring to life incremental features and capabilities.

Eul discussed Intel’s focus on enabling a richer media and content experience by improving graphics performance. He then highlighted the tablet platform’s new Gen 7 graphics that will offer more than three times the graphics capabilities1, with support for DX11 for expanded PC application and game support.

The new Intel Atom processor-based platform comes equipped with hardware-based security with McAfee Live Safe. This digital life protection suite keeps online identity private, protects from phishing attacks and keeps data secure while protecting the devices.

Intel’s next-generation Atom processor for tablets will provide the benefits of both performance and productivity. Any task performed on a tablet or 2-in-1 device, from light photo editing to office productivity, becomes much faster and more interactive. People will see increased capability and richer content and will be able to play popular 3-D games on these sleek, battery-efficient devices than previously possible.

Bay Trail also represents the first time Intel is offering its customers a mobile platform solution that is flexible with regard to operating system and the company will provide the same great Intel tablet performance and high-resolution graphics at cost savings to consumers.

Enabling Mobile Devices with Intel Inside®
Intel platform and enabling programs have been the foundation of OEM and ODM innovation for decades. Eul said the company is currently focused on work with leading ODMs and OEMs to speed time-to-market of leading-edge mobile devices based on Intel technology.

Intel’s platform and ecosystem enabling efforts will be focused initially on Intel Atom processor-based tablets running Android* and Windows*. The company is providing pre-qualified solutions with simplified building blocks to scale designs quickly for mature and emerging markets.

Read more on Intel Newsroom.

Intel formalizes Thunderbolt 2, promises products this year

While Intel gave us the technical rundown on its next iteration of Thunderbolt two months earlier, it’s now announced that it will officially be known as the not-particularly-original Thunderbolt 2. Promising 20 Gbps throughput and support for 4K video, Intel is now vowing to bring the port to market sometime this year. For a reminder, we’ve added the company’s NAB demo after the break.

 

 

Intel formalizes Thunderbolt 2, promises products this year.

AnandTech | The Haswell Review: Intel Core i7-4770K & i5-4560K Tested

The Launch Lineup: Quad Cores For All

As was the case with the launch of Ivy Bridge last year, Intel is initially launching with their high-end quad core parts, and as the year passes on will progressively rollout dual cores, low voltage parts, and other lower-end parts. That means the bigger notebooks and naturally the performance desktops will arrive first, followed by the ultraportables, Ultrabooks and more affordable desktops. One change however is that Intel will be launching their first BGA (non-socketed) Haswell part right away, the Iris Pro equipped i7-4770R.

Intel 4th Gen Core i7 Desktop Processors
Model Core i7-4770K Core i7-4770 Core i7-4770S Core i7-4770T Core i7-4770R Core i7-4765T
Cores/Threads 4/8 4/8 4/8 4/8 4/8 4/8
CPU Base Freq 3.5 3.4 3.1 2.5 3.2 2.0
Max Turbo 3.9 (Unlocked) 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.9 3.0
Test TDP 84W 84W 65W 45W 65W 35W
HD Graphics 4600 4600 4600 4600 Iris Pro 5200 4600
GPU Max Clock 1250 1200 1200 1200 1300 1200
L3 Cache 8MB 8MB 8MB 8MB 6MB 8MB
DDR3 Support 1333/1600 1333/1600 1333/1600 1333/1600 1333/1600 1333/1600
vPro/TXT/VT-d/SIPP No Yes Yes Yes No Yes
Package LGA-1150 LGA-1150 LGA-1150 LGA-1150 BGA LGA-1150
Price $339 $303 $303 $303 OEM $303

Starting at the top of the product and performance stack, we have the desktop Core i7 parts. All of these CPUs feature Hyper-Threading Technology, so they’re the same quad-core with four virtual cores that we’ve seen since Bloomfield hit the scene. The fastest chip for most purposes remains the K-series 4770K, with its unlocked multiplier and slightly higher base clock speed. Base core clocks as well as maximum Turbo Boost clocks are basically dictated by the TDP, with the 4770S being less likely to maintain maximum turbo most likely, and the 4770T and 4765T giving up quite a bit more in clock speed in order to hit substantially lower power targets.

It’s worth pointing out that the highest “Test TDP” values are up slightly relative to the last generation Ivy Bridge equivalents—84W instead of 77W. Mobile TDPs are a different matter, and as we’ll discuss elsewhere they’re all 2W higher, but that is further offset by the improved idle power consumption Haswell brings.

Nearly all of these are GT2 graphics configurations (20 EUs), so they should be slightly faster than the last generation HD 4000 in graphics workloads. The one exception is the i7-4770R, which is also the only chip that comes in a BGA package. The reasoning here is simple: if you want the fastest iGPU configuration (GT3e with 40 EUs and embedded DRAM), you’re probably not going to have a discrete GPU and will most likely be purchasing an OEM desktop. Interestingly, the 4770R also drops the L3 cache down to 6MB, and it’s not clear whether this is due to it having no real benefit (i.e. the eDRAM may function as an even larger L4 cache), or if it’s to reduce power use slightly, or Intel may have a separate die for this particular configuration. Then again, maybe Intel is just busily creating a bit of extra market segmentation.

Not included in the above table are all the common features to the entire Core i7 line: AVX2 instructions, Quick Sync, AES-NI, PCIe 3.0, and Intel Virtualization Technology. As we’ve seen in the past, the K-series parts (and now the R-series as well) omit support for vPro, TXT, VT-d, and SIPP from the list. The 4770K is an enthusiast part with overclocking support, so that makes some sense, but the 4770R doesn’t really have the same qualification. Presumably it’s intended for the consumer market, as businesses are less likely to need the Iris Pro graphics.

Intel 4th Gen Core i5 Desktop Processors
Model Core i5-4670K Core i5-4670 Core i5-4670S Core i5-4670T Core i5-4570 Core i5-4570S
Cores/Threads 4/4 4/4 4/4 4/4 4/4 4/4
CPU Base Freq 3.4 3.4 3.1 2.3 3.2 2.9
Max Turbo 3.8 (Unlocked) 3.8 3.8 3.3 3.6 3.6
Test TDP 84W 84W 65W 45W 84W 65W
HD Graphics 4600 4600 4600 4600 4600 4600
GPU Max Clock 1200 1200 1200 1200 1150 1150
L3 Cache 6MB 6MB 6MB 6MB 6MB 6MB
DDR3 Support 1333/1600 1333/1600 1333/1600 1333/1600 1333/1600 1333/1600
vPro/TXT/VT-d/SIPP No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Package LGA-1150 LGA-1150 LGA-1150 LGA-1150 LGA-1150 LGA-1150
Price $242 $213 $213 $213 $192 $192

The Core i5 lineup basically rehashes the above story, only now without Hyper-Threading. For many users, Core i5 is the sweet spot of price and performance, delivering nearly all the performance of the i7 models at 2/3 the price. There aren’t any Iris or Iris Pro Core i5 desktop parts, at least not yet, and all of the above CPUs are using the GT2 graphics configuration. As above, the K-series part also lacks vPro/TXT/VT-d support but comes with an unlocked multiplier.

Obviously we’re still missing all of the Core i3 parts, which are likely to be dual-core once more, along with some dual-core i5 parts as well. These are probably going to come in another quarter, or at least a month or two out, as there’s no real need for Intel to launch their lower cost parts right now. Similarly, we don’t have any Celeron or Pentium Haswell derivatives launching yet, and judging by the Ivy Bridge rollout I suspect it may be a couple quarters before Intel pushes out ultra-budget Haswell chips. For now, the Ivy Bridge Celeron/Pentium parts are likely as low as Intel wants to go down the food chain for their “big core” architectures.

Read the full review @ AnandTech.

Changing Post Meta information and markup

I am attemting to change some of the “meta” information for blog posts. In particular the “Quote Caption” location of the Quote Post Format. This is really only applicable to WP 3.6+ which is currently still in beta. I have been working on a theme which was based on Automattic’s “Twentythirteen” theme which makes great used of the new features in WP 3.6+.

I changed the post layout so that the category will be on top followed by title. In case of the “Quote Post Format” the category will be named according to the category “Quote” in order to keep them easily searchable by category instead of post type. Everything worked out good so far but I did encounter one problem.

192

Underneath the title of the quote, which is not actually really a title but rather the caption, i wanted to list the author and the source of the quote. The meta for the quote post format pulls the information automatically and displays it underneath the quote itself. Which is not where i want it. I could relocated via CSS; however, i don’t want anything funky to happen if someone uses a different browser. I would much rather pull the meta into the location where i want it. I am not a complete noobie to PHP and/or WP but things I have tried so far have not worked out so I hope to get some help.

If you have any ideas or suggestions, let me know.

Samsung reportedly turning to Intel to power next-gen Galaxy Tab | The Verge

Reuters reports that an upcoming Android tablet from Samsung will be powered by none other than Intel. According to its sources, the Galaxy Tab 3 10.1 will use Intel’s Clover Trail+ chip — alternatively known as the Atom Z2580 — in at least one of its configurations. It’s not specified when the new tablet will be announced, but Samsungdoes have a media event scheduled for June 20th where it will debut new products in both its Galaxy and Ativ lines. The product would join the low-end 7-inch Galaxy Tab 3 thatSamsung introduced last month.

It would also mark a shift for Samsung, which has previously used ARM chips in the 10.1-inch Tab line (it does use Intel processors in its Ativ Windows products). While Reutersdoesn’t delve into just what’s behind the change, it would no doubt be a welcome development for Intel, which has struggled in mobile with its x86 silicon thus far.

Source: The Verge.

It’s (Mostly) Official: Yahoo Buying Tumblr Youth Serum for $1.1B

Cash! The WSJ says “the Yahoo board has approved a deal” to make this happen, and it’s hard to imagine Tumblr turning this down. One of the most unpopular companies in the world will soon own one of the most popular in history, and we’ll all find out if you really can buy cool.

A billion dollars for a company with a massive, young, ad-averse, GIF-swapping user base and an open disdain for revenue—Yahoo’s shareholders are probably a little puzzled, if they aren’t prima facie dazzled by how often Tumblr is characterized as “cool” and “young”—that demographic elixer Yahoo will now try to vampire-suck out of Tumblr. Cool, cool, cool, young, young, so young.

Tumblr’s investors won’t be so dazzled, as they were hoping for a hell of a lot more than a billion dollars. Then again, these same investors poured millions into a company that, as mentioned, never made making money a priority—Tumblr should consider itself lucky to have this deus ex Marissa Mayer, the ultimate bail-out.

Read more @ ValleyWAG.

Google H840 Media Player Spotted In FCC Testing

Google H480 FCC EUT

Earlier this year, Google decided to discontinue the social streaming media player known as the Nexus Q.  However, a new Google media player gadget has been spotted in FCC testing documents with the product name H840.  The product code is the H2G2-42, which is a play on the The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

The wireless report confirms that the device “functions as a media player.”  Some of the specs of the device includes a 2.4GHz WiFi b/g/n connectivity.  The FCC report does not contain test photos so we do not know what the device looks like.  It is likely that the H840 will support Google Play Music All Access and will have similar functionality as a Sonos media player that can be connected to external speakers.

The Google H840 will likely have a much more friendly user interface than the Nexus Q with more features.  The Nexus Q was essentially a way to play YouTube videos, music, and other content to a TV using Android-powered phones and tablets.  Essentially, the Nexus Q was Google’s own Apple TV.  Earlier this month, Google Play stopped supporting the Nexus Q after the All Access subscription music services was integrated into the marketplace.  Another disadvantage of the Google Nexus Q is that it was manufactured in the U.S., causing it to have a high price.  The Apple TV retails for around $99 currently and the Nexus Q was priced at $299 when it was launched.

Another reason why the Nexus Q had low demand is because it was linked exclusively to Google Play content.  There were no options to connect to Netflix, Hulu Plus, or Amazon Instant Video.  This is why I suspect that the upcoming H840 will have options to connect to these other video services.

FCC Sample Label:

Google H480 FCC Sample Label

Read more @ Pulse 2.0.